Court Verdict goes against FTC’s Contempt Motion against Scott Chandler

FTC filed a contempt motion against Scott Chandler for arguing against the submission of asked bitcoin. However, the court did not find evidence linking to an intent for violation.
Court Verdict goes against FTC’s Contempt Motion against Scott Chandler
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In March 2018, Scott Chandler with other two defendants was sued by FTC for being the top earners in the Bitcoin Funding Team., JetCoin Scam as well as My7NNetwork. Right after the convictions and pertaining to the frozen assets through the Temporary Restraining Order, Scott filed an objection stating that they knew nothing and cannot be sued.

However, the objection was dismissed and as per the preliminary injunction, Scott was required to turn over the acquired bitcoin.

When Scott refused to do so, the FTC filed a contempt motion which was denied by the court.

It all happened when Scott tried to argue about turning over the bitcoin. As per Scott, the injunction would size bitcoin which was obtained legitimately, however, was denied any concession in October.

Scott even tried to submit few evidenced which outlined the purchase of around 30,000 dollars in bitcoin. This again was denied by FTC. Later that, Scott also submitted the names of the friends who lost money. But, seems like it wasn’t an evidence for FTC.

Against all these evidence, FTC submitted messages from four cell phones. This was an email conversation and was admitted as evidence against Scott.

It took two days of hearing for the court to finalize the hearing against FTC’s contempt motion. However, FTC failed to prove their stand and it was found that the evidence did not relate to Scott’s intention of violating the preliminary injunction order.

It was very lucid that Scott did violate the injunction as he did not turn over the bitcoin. But FTC could not prove to the court that the act was intended. Hence, Scott got a waiver.

However, Scott is not at all out of trouble. The court has also asked Scott to submit the access of all passwords of Skype, WhatsApp and Facebook accounts. Isn’t that still a win-win deal for FTC?

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